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About

Sugar Mill
Sugar Mill

Founded in 1962, with one of the aims being to gather historical records of the Canterbury District, the Society has since the mid 1980's operated a Family and Local History Research Centre in the historic Beulah Vista home, located in Church St. Canterbury.

The aim of the Society is....

  • To encourage the study of history, both of the Canterbury District and Australia.
  • To collect records and objects relating to Canterbury's history.
  • To publish journals, periodicals and books relating to the history of Canterbury.
  • Membership Fees:  
  • Regular Member; $20 per annum,                                    Pensioner, Senior, Student, $15 per annum,                    Families/Institutions, $25 per annum                               Supporter/Friends Member (non voting) $5 per annum

Latest news from our Facebook Page

4 days ago

Canterbury & District Historical Society

#FlashbackFriday Denman Avenue, Wiley Park in the 1940s. In the distance is Canterbury Road. Back then, this area was part of Punchbowl.
#whereinterestinghappens #history
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5 days ago

Canterbury & District Historical Society

#FridayFlashback
"Duranbah" Homer Street, Earlwood, pre 1904.

Margaret Hocking in the front garden of "Duranbah" with Snogan the horse and Jock the dog. "Duranbah" was located on Homer Street, Earlwood and was the home of George Frederick and Margaret Douglas Scotland (nee Nicoll) Hocking. Margaret's father was George Wallace Nicoll started the Nicoll Shipping Line and "Duranbah" was named after a ship in his fleet which was wrecked near Murwillumbah, New South Wales. "Duranbah" was sold to the Catholic Church in 1923 and was used as a convent until it was demolished and eventually replaced by the present Our Lady of Lourdes Church.
Courtesy of Ron Hocking and Canterbury-Bankstown Local History Photograph Collection.
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1 week ago

Canterbury & District Historical Society

Armistice celebrations at Chardville, 8th Avenue, Campsie 1918. House with bunting hung up and people in front.

The Armistice was signed at 11 o'clock on 11th November 1918 between the Allied Armies and Germany at Compiègne, France, for the cessation of hostilities on land, sea and in the air.The 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month attained a special significance in the post-war years. The moment when hostilities ceased on the Western Front became universally associated with the remembrance of those who had died in the war. This first modern world conflict had brought about the mobilisation of over 70 million people and left between 9 and 13 million dead, perhaps as many as one-third of them with no known grave. The allied nations chose this day and time for the commemoration of their war dead.

Courtesy Miss E. More and City of Canterbury Local History Photograph Collection
#armisticeday1918
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1 week ago

Canterbury & District Historical Society

Lest We ForgetJust over 1900 men and 5 women volunteered from Canterbury for service in World War 1 between 1914 and 1918. This represented 11% of the municipalities population at the outbreak of war and about 36% of the eligible male population.
Over 96% of the men who enlisted joined the infantry and the 4% of men who joined the Light Horse were chiefly from the land and from the racing stables around Canterbury Racecourse.
18% of the total number died while on active service and the average age of enlisted was 24 years of age.
The many railwaymen of Belmore and Lakemba who enlisted at the end of 1916in the special railway draft of fitters, firemen and locomotive drivers, were mostly older men who already had established families.

Information from "Canterbury Boy's: World War 1 and Sydney's suburban fringe" Edited by Lesley Muir and the Canterbury and District Historical Society. published 2002.

Photo "Campsie Boys" at Amesbury Camp, England, 14th August 1916. Courtesy of Joyce Ormsby and Canterbury-Bankstown Local History Photographic Collection
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